Purdue University Adopts ChyronHego’s Paint Telestration Tool for Football and Basketball Games

Purdue University Adopts ChyronHego’s Paint Telestration Tool for Football and Basketball Games

MELVILLE, N.Y. — Thursday, May 14, 2015

Spectators in the Stands See Illustrated Replays on In-House Video Boards for a Broadcast-Like Experience

Purdue University’s Hall of Music Productions has deployed ChyronHego’s Paint telestration tool in its sports-production workflows to add on-screen graphics to replays when covering Purdue football and basketball games. 

Shown on video boards inside the football stadium and basketball arena, the “illustrated replays” provide a broadcast-like experience for fans in attendance. Hall of Music Productions not only serves as the in-house production company for Purdue University’s performing arts venues, but also provides production services to other clients on and off campus — in this case, the university’s athletic department.

“The challenge we are facing now is how to bring fans into the stadium while providing the same experiences they can get watching the game at home on television. Broadcasters have long used on-screen illustrations and graphics during replays to demonstrate an idea or make a point about the action for the people who are watching on TV. Paint provides us the means to show fans in the stands the same type of replays on our in-house video screens that they can see in their living rooms,” said Scott Horton, creative director and game day video director at Hall of Music Productions. “Paint is more than just a telestration tool; it’s a high-quality analysis tool that does a great job of indicating the significance of a play. Given its power and features, you would think Paint would be a complex tool, but it’s easy to use — our team learned it in a day. It was also surprisingly affordable. What’s more, because we can use Paint to insert sponsor logos, it opens up new revenue opportunities.”

Starting last fall with the 2014 football season, Hall of Music Productions began using Paint in a common control room that serves both the Ross-Ade Stadium (for football) and Mackey Arena (for basketball). Paint lets anyone on the production team, whether in front of or behind the camera, visually analyze game-play by adding graphics and highlighting video using Paint’s variety of feature-rich telestration tools. The resulting combination of replay, graphics, and analysis is what ChyronHego calls “illustrated replay,” displayed on in-house video boards to enhance the experience for people in the stands. For example, a commentator might draw a virtual line to show the trajectory of a pass in football or the height of a jump shot in basketball, or add a graphic to indicate the distance to the next first down.

With Paint, Hall of Music Productions also has the potential to generate more ad revenue. For example, the production team could show second or even third replays of the same play, using Paint to show different camera angles and key a different virtual logo each time in order to monetize each of the replays. With Paint’s many telestration tools, users can also manipulate the logos in different ways, such as making them static or animated, or adjusting the opacity to make them more or less transparent. 

Paint has a wide selection of graphic highlighting tools, a built-in chroma keyer, and an integrated camera-tracking capability that enables production teams to create compelling content simply and swiftly. Within a game, Hall of Music Productions can create dozens of live telestrated clips or store them at the ready for near-live replays or postgame analysis.

“Through Hall of Music Productions, Purdue University is the first NCAA Division I school to integrate Paint into its sports productions,” said Johan Apel, president and CEO, ChyronHego. “We’re pleased to be able to help Purdue and its production team not only create a better experience for fans but potentially generate more revenue as well. This deployment at Purdue is a great example of Paint’s potential to boost production values within college sports venues themselves.”